Current Page: 7 of 167
Re: Universal medicine
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: April 13, 2012 10:07PM

Note: Leonardo da Vinci was Italian though reportedly vegetarian would have spent his life eating wheat products cheese and drinking wine - all of which are reportedly forbidden to UM disciples.

Yet this diet and access to the greatest minds of his day did not prevent Leonardo from accomplishing what he did.

So...why tell UM students to honor Leonardo da Vinci, have his art on their walls, yet forbid them the rich and unfettered social life and diet he enjoyed?

And unlike UM students who are told to move gently and feebly, stories are told that Leonardo was so strong a man that stories were told of how he could bend an iron horseshoe with his bare hands.

He became a great man with a magical name by NOT living the restricted way of life and diet that UM students are told to live..

[www.google.com]

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Universal medicine
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: April 13, 2012 10:11PM

Here is a post on Leonardo da Vinci's diet based on his manuscripts.

[www.google.com]

Quote

Snoot fun
Creative Commons License photo credit: Phil Romans
Many of the foods we eat today - including tomatoes, corn, potatoes, and chocolate, were “discovered” by explorers to the New World, and introduced into the European diet only after Leonardo’s death in 1519.

Leonardo’s manuscripts for the time when he lived in Florence from 1500-1506 provide us with several lists of food items which are often interpreted as shopping lists or accounting entries for his household.

Although not all of the entries are in Leonardo’s handwriting, items listed include: good beef, eggs, wine, meat, mulberries, mushrooms, salad, fruit, flour, bran, herbs, buttermilk, and melon.

Although Leonardo designed stage sets and mechanical devices for The Duke of Milan’s court banquets – which were renowned for their sumptuous dishes - Leonardo’s writings reflect moderation regarding food and wine. One excerpt reads:

Quote

To keep in health this rule is wise.
Eat only when you want and sup light.
Chew well, and let what you take be well cooked and simple…
(Codex Atlanticus)

Some of Leonardo’s manuscripts suggest that he may have preferred a more vegetarian type of diet, although vegetarianism was somewhat controversial during his time period.

Leonardo’s interest in diet may be seen in a list of books that he owned around 1499, including an edition of Bartolomeo Sacchi’s work On Right Pleasure first published in 1470. Sacchi, perhaps better known as Platina, relied heavily on ancient Greek and Roman writings regarding the medical properties of food, and proper consumption.

Thus, Leonardo’s mention of parsley, mint, wild thyme, burnt bread, vinegar, pepper, salt, may not simply be a recipe for a salad, but a remedy for a stomach condition.

Drawings of edible plants, including blackberries, are found in some of Leonardo’s manuscripts. In addition, he used citron trees, olive trees, fruits, and nuts as the subjects of some of his fables

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Universal medicine
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: April 13, 2012 10:32PM

Concerning tattoos, they cost money. Money that cannot be spent on other things.

Two, once you have a tattoo, you have to care for the site, keep it clean, bandaged, out of the sun. Which means giving some care and respect to your own body - and following advice from the tattoo artist which would entail some independence from the wrap around world of UM.

A tattoo artist might note that you look pale, undernourished and might also notice and tell you that your healing is perhaps delayed and ask what is going on.

Plus, in the waiting room, you'd be meeting people from outside UM and see magazines and artwork that is outside UM.

Little is known of Pythagora's teachings. Unlike modern day spiritual entrepreneurs, Pythagoras, kept a "quite unusual silence."

Quote

Porphyry (233-c.305 BC) stated in his Vita Pythagorae: "What Pythagoras said to his associates there is no one who can tell for certain, since they observed a quite unusual silence."

Pythagoras' teaching methods provided later a model for Hugh of St. Victor (c.1097-1141), who mentioned them in The Didascalion, a guide for the study of texts:

"for seven years, according to the number of the seven liberal arts, no one of his pupils dared ask the reason behind statements made by him; instead, he was to give credence to the words of the master until he had heard him out, and then, having done this, he would be able to come at the reason of those things himself."

As a result, it is very difficult to separate Pythagoras' original ideas from those of his followers and later commentators.

[www.kirjasto.sci.fi]

One persistent bit of information is that the Pythagoreans were vegetarian but abstained from beans. This means they would have been free to drink wine, eat wheat and barley and oats, and use dairy products.

Quote

The Pythagorean Order was largely a mystical organization. Its members followed a strict way of life. They practiced asceticism and vegetarianism, with one exception in their diet: "do not eat beans" - this was connected to purification of the soul. Iambichus of Chalcis (c.250-c.325 AD) tells in The Life of Pythagoras, that as a result, Pythagoras' "sleep was short, his soul pure and vigilant, and the general health of his body was invariable." According to Pythagorean teaching, "both the universe and man, the macrocosm and microcosm, are constructed on the same harmonic proportions."

This statement is common to theosophy and Iamblichus and later commentators were heavily influenced by various Theosophic systems current in the Hellenistic and late Roman world.

Because there is so little information about Pythagoras, he is a handy recipient for fantasizing.

Dodd in his book, The Greeks and the Irrational, traces some sources of Pythagorean thought.

[books.google.com]

Another article. There is nothing said about tonics or medicines attributed to Pythagoras or his school

[webcache.googleusercontent.com]

[www.google.com]

Pythagoras is celebrated as a mathematician. Would be in his legacy to advise UM disciples to take arithmatic up thorugh and including geometry.

Had Pythagoras lived the restricted life of UM, he could not have become Pythagoras.

Had Leonardo da Vinci lived the underfed and restricted life of UM, he could not have become Leonardo.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Universal medicine
Posted by: HerbertKane178 ()
Date: April 13, 2012 11:57PM

Quote
corboy
Here is a post on Leonardo da Vinci's diet based on his manuscripts.

[www.google.com]

Quote

Snoot fun
Creative Commons License photo credit: Phil Romans
Many of the foods we eat today - including tomatoes, corn, potatoes, and chocolate, were “discovered” by explorers to the New World, and introduced into the European diet only after Leonardo’s death in 1519.

Leonardo’s manuscripts for the time when he lived in Florence from 1500-1506 provide us with several lists of food items which are often interpreted as shopping lists or accounting entries for his household.

Although not all of the entries are in Leonardo’s handwriting, items listed include: good beef, eggs, wine, meat, mulberries, mushrooms, salad, fruit, flour, bran, herbs, buttermilk, and melon.

Although Leonardo designed stage sets and mechanical devices for The Duke of Milan’s court banquets – which were renowned for their sumptuous dishes - Leonardo’s writings reflect moderation regarding food and wine. One excerpt reads:

Quote

To keep in health this rule is wise.
Eat only when you want and sup light.
Chew well, and let what you take be well cooked and simple…
(Codex Atlanticus)

Some of Leonardo’s manuscripts suggest that he may have preferred a more vegetarian type of diet, although vegetarianism was somewhat controversial during his time period.

Leonardo’s interest in diet may be seen in a list of books that he owned around 1499, including an edition of Bartolomeo Sacchi’s work On Right Pleasure first published in 1470. Sacchi, perhaps better known as Platina, relied heavily on ancient Greek and Roman writings regarding the medical properties of food, and proper consumption.

Thus, Leonardo’s mention of parsley, mint, wild thyme, burnt bread, vinegar, pepper, salt, may not simply be a recipe for a salad, but a remedy for a stomach condition.

Drawings of edible plants, including blackberries, are found in some of Leonardo’s manuscripts. In addition, he used citron trees, olive trees, fruits, and nuts as the subjects of some of his fables

It seems like he ate well, and ate what he wanted. As you said, none of this effected his genius.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/13/2012 11:59PM by HerbertKane178.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Universal medicine
Posted by: frodobaggins ()
Date: April 14, 2012 05:35AM

Thanks for the post Rod! My question to you is.... What makes Serge "know it all" What makes him more connected then the other thousand "gurus" out there who claim to know the answer.

Very arrogant to assume UM members live with integrity and the rest of us don't.

Lets look at Serge issue with alcohol. Lets take a grape and then we ferment it and then it becomes wine ( a basic description). It comes from nature and the wine isn't the issue in the end. I have Many friends who can enjoy a glass of wine over dinner and don't turn into drunks. You don't need to follow UM to know that binge drinking is bad for you and why do those who choose to enjoy a single beer have to endure such scare mongering. I must note that i am a non drinker for my own personal reasons however i certainly don't judge or think my friends lack integrity because they enjoy a wine occasionally over dinner or lunch.

So Serge has an issue with wine because it possesses bad energy! Hypocritical because UM members still eat Lamb.

Lets look at a cute little lamb. We shove it in a cage.... stunned by electric shock and then we slit its throat and then 1 week later its on our dinner plate.

If UM's mandate is to be "all loving" then why is it ok to eat lamb yet not drink wine? Surely killing an animal is BAD energy is it not?

I am actually a meat eater but this is only ONE of the hypocrisy's of UM.

And Rod i know as do many others first hand what happens when you don't join your partner in following Serge's baseless belief structure. You say your encouraged to stay integrated into society yet in the same sentence you explain you don't go anywhere there is alcohol. So when a friend invites you to a BBQ or dinner your partner chooses not to come because people will be drinking. UM doesn't like sporting competition so when you want to go and watch a sporting event your partner won't come because of this stupid belief that competition is bad energy. I could go on and on and continue to point out the flaws in this cult.

Finally, why would anyone trust a guy to deliver the "truth" who claims to be 3 times reincarnated ( of course all famous people) and claim to have the power to interpret your dreams. Surely that ALONE would ring alarm bells with people.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Universal medicine
Posted by: frodobaggins ()
Date: April 14, 2012 05:39AM

Publicly on this forum i would like to thank Corby for his contributions. Clearly you are going above and beyond to track down rational and logical information. Thank you

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Universal medicine
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: April 14, 2012 08:43AM

I happened to read a book about Leonardo da Vinci and early Italian cuisine. Magpie mind.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Universal medicine
Posted by: MacReady ()
Date: April 15, 2012 06:13AM

Hello Rod and thank you for sharing your experiences with UM. A few points if I may:

As you say, in all religions there are truths that have been altered by men to suit their needs. Possibly so, but this critique applies equally to Serge's belief system, since it consists of a grab-bag of second-hand Buddhist ideas, deities from the Hindu pantheon, mixed up with Alice A. Bailey's bizarre New Age concepts, but all altered just enough for him to copyright it as his own and rake in hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. All with zero evidence that any of the elements he has chosen from said religions are indeed the 'true' parts, as they are no more or less provable or far-fetched than any other part.

Regarding 'God being within' and 'Not needing a building, rituals or readings to access', I have no problem with these assertions, but they don't really apply to UM despite all the rhetoric. If they did, nobody would need Serge's clinics, workshops and retreats, they wouldn't need his convoluted religious writings, his magical healing symbols, the ritualistic lifestyle recommendations (sleep only between certain hours, UM approved yoga, UM approved meditation, UM approved exercise, UM approved music, UM approved dance etc). Essentially you wouldn't need Universal Medicine.

As for the claim of there being 'no adoration of Serge' this is far from the truth. At the workshops there were always some students hovering around him (including children) for a chance to give him a hug. The homes of every student I met were full of Serge's magical healing symbols (which only work because it was Serge who 'brought them through' from the Hierarchy), Da Vinci's artwork (which Serge claims to have painted in a previous life), Serge quotes on walls and doors, Serge's books and health products. Moreover, every person I know who adheres to the UM belief system cannot go long without dropping a Serge quote in conversation or otherwise speaking of him in adoring terms. They also all imitate his phrasing and terminology. I've never heard any UM follower apply any serious critical questioning or logic to any of his claims. Ever. His every word is accepted as indisputable divine fact.

The above negates the assertion that 'the claim that UM is a cult is completely false'. If all it consisted of were some healthy lifestyle recommendations, his clinic and the healing/massage techniques taught in the workshops you might have a point. However, given that everything UM presents is based on the claim that Serge is a multi-reincarnated holy messenger (in communication with a parliament of heavenly spirit Lords living in Shamballa who have a divine plan for humanity), and the only living human being presenting the true path to God, the contention that UM is a cult is quite accurate.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Universal medicine
Posted by: HerbertKane178 ()
Date: April 15, 2012 11:47AM

Thank you MacReady and frodobaggins for 2 of the most concise, well rounded and truthful critiques of UM I have ever heard. The both cut to the point and offer unquestionable logic to this issue.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Universal medicine
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: April 16, 2012 12:09AM

One persons opinion on Alice Bailey

[webcache.googleusercontent.com]


Quote

Editor's Note: Beware of any "book club" formed around the teachings of Alice Bailey, as these may exhibit the coercive characteristics of a cult that are inherent within the Alice Bailey philosophies - particularly the books, Discipleship in a New Age volumes I and II.

To get a flavor go here

[webcache.googleusercontent.com]

and

[webcache.googleusercontent.com]

Quote

Discipleship in the New Age Vol I HC
These two volumes contain the record of a series of personal and group instructions given to a small group of aspirants over a period of fifteen years by a Master of the Wisdom. They contain detailed teachings on Meditation, Initiation and the Six Stages of Discipleship. They emphasise the new age, pioneering necessity for group work, the development of group consciousness, and the change in training for initiation from individuals to discipleship groups.

Hardcover, Vol. 1, 9 780853 300038, 790 pages

$49.00 | £29.00 (Special Offer : Now $33.00 / £18.50)

ItemMore about this item
Login | Register
(Please login or register to make a purchase online.)

How many would-be disciples are convinced of their worthiness to receive direct training from a Master of the Wisdom?

How few are able to absorb the intense pressures of the experience and to profit from the opportunity!

Included in these two volumes of "Discipleship in the New Age" are the series of personal instructions given to a small group of chelas over a period of 15 years, with related teaching on a number of subjects.

When the group effort was finally discontinued, the Tibetan Master remarked that while his purpose in establishing the group for Ashramic training had proved unsuccessful, the instructions and teaching given as a result of forming the group would prove of great and continuing value to increasing numbers of aspirants to discipleship; and certain important concepts were anchored in human consciousness through the group channel, including particularly vital fact of the reappearance of the Christ.

As the interplay between Hierarchy and humanity strengthens, many young disciples approaching the periphery of an Ashram are profiting from the experience of this group brought together for training by the Tibetan, and from the wealth of careful teaching and spiritual stimulation made avaflable to them.

Quote

The requirements facing a disciple in the new age are drastic and heavy; they involve as a first prerequisite, the need for personal decentralisation, the relinquishment of individual preferences and emphasis of every kind, and absorption into a group for service purposes. "The entire subject of group interplay is far deeper and more significant than you suspect or appreciate" we are told.

The development of group consciousness is a matter of often painful experience in self-forgetfulness, requiring also a sensitive response to the purpose and plan of the Master through some Hierarchically inspired area of work.

(Bolded for emphasis by Corboy. William James would have called this the moral equivalent of war.)

The obvious and the subtle glamours and illusions which deceive the disciple and limit his consciousness, must be clearly identified, seen, known and transcended. The disciple must recogise himself as he is, and move on towards the next spiritual objective.

In the first part of Volume I of "Discipleship in the New Age" some of the requirements of the Hierarchical Plan and the place of service of discipleship groups are clearly shown in relationship. The "Six Stages of Discipleship" in the final part of the book show the sequence of growth in consciousness towards the center of an Ashram so clearly, that only the self-deluded can fail to identify his own place and his resulting opportunity.

Between these two parts of the book, training and teaching hints and personal instructions are given to each of 41 disciples and applicants for discipleship. In these direct and outspoken comments any sincere aspirant to discipleship can find himself and his own need understood and met, sometimes in drastic terms, from the deep spiritual insight, the knowledge and the love of a Master of the Wisdom.

So this pioneering group training effort is perpetuated for those who tread the Path of Discipleship today.


[webcache.googleusercontent.com]

Quote

While the original intention behind the group working instructions contained in Volume I, was to externalise eventually through groups of nine integrated disciples, the work of nine subjectively organised groups (hence the name "Groups of Nine" given to this work), this second volume contains the teaching given between the years 1940 and 1949 after the group had been reduced and reorganised into one group, "the new seed group".
One of the main objectives of the new seed group was to "anchor" some of the principles and seed ideas for the new civilisation of the Aquarian era; and also to create an integrated group of trained Hierarchical workers capable of providing needed cooperation with activities initiated by Hierarchy to fertilise and prepare human consciousness for the tremendous stimulation of the immediate future. In this book, therefore, the personal instructions cover a shorter period of time and only 22 individuals.
Much of the teaching continues to emphasise the needs and the problems of group work, group fusion, group consciousness and the relationship of members of a group to one another and to the Master whom they seek to serve. "Let your horizon be wide and your humility great" the group is told, so that "an adjusted sense of right proportion"--the esoteric definition of humility--may regulate the growth in all relationships in conformity with the evolutionary needs of the Hierarchical Plan.
Two vitally important aspects of the life of discipleship are emphasised from the standpoint of practical training techniques--meditation and initiation. Meditation is shown not only as a way of approach by the individual to the soul, and by the group to the Master, but as the creative technique of the Lord of the World by which all is brought into being. All centres of consciousness in the planet, large and small, can employ the same meditative techniques to create the new and needed forms consistent with the changing emphasis of energy flow and divine purpose. Meditation thus becomes an act of conscious cooperation with "the strictly redemptive purposes" of our planetary life.
The teachings on initiation are also given an essentially practical presentation as "facts of life", to be understood and applied. The glamourous idea of initiation as a reward for a good, self-disciplined way of life, dissipates in the light of the reality. Neither has initiation for the disciple anything to do with the internal, organisational "initiations" peculiar to many occult orders and groups, which are meaningless except in the context of the organisation itself.

Initiation for the disciple is the result of a conscious expansion into "larger and larger wholes"--a progressive expansion into the actual stream of consciousness of our planetary Life. These expansions in consciousness are accompanied by a succession of revelations; and in this volume of "Discipleship in the New Age", five points of revelation are discussed, with hints and symbolic formulas leading to a correct interpretation of them.

A disciple is "one who knows"; he has learned through personal experience that spiritual law and principle applied in service, create a condition of balance in which relationship is restored between the Way of God and the ways of men. Through that point of fusion light can radiate for the benefit of those who stumble in the dark. True revelation is a shared experience

Corboy note: It is impossible for a non disciple to have any hope of dialogue with "one who knows".

Options: ReplyQuote
Current Page: 7 of 167


Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.
This forum powered by Phorum.