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Re: James Arthur Ray - 2 die at Arizona retreat's sweat lodge
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: December 20, 2009 08:56AM

Marya Hornbacher, who has a quite severe variety of BAD (Bipolar Affective Disorder) called Rapid Cycling 2, wrote a memoir entitled Madness.

One of the many valuable things she mentions in this book is that the more manic episodes incurred by someone who has BAD, the more sensitized they become and the frequency of manic episodes increases, apparently by the CNS becoming 'kindled' and more easily triggered by stressors.

That is why early diagnosis of BAD and prompt adherance to medication and the needed lifestyle modifications is essential.

Hornbacher noted several things that trigger BAD and she ruefully listed them

Drink tons of caffiene

Live a high stress life

Stay up late and dont sleep

Use alcohol and street drugs

Refuse to follow the advice of your prescribing psychiatrist

The other thing described by Hornbacher is the way she went on spending sprees when manic.

Small wonder that profit minded persons might WANT folks to go manic...you're so much more likely to blow your money.

Two persons with BAD told me that one not only needs at least 7 to 8 hours of high quality sleep each night, but that it is important to get up at dawn, rather than force onself to get up in the dark predawn hours. Even with sufficent sleep getting up in the dark may be enough to destabilize someone with BAD. It is a medical psychiatric condition intimately tied to the dark and light cycles of natural sunshine.

being binned up in a seminar room without windows, all access to natural sunshine blocked, and time distorted by removal of clocks, plus sleeplessness and stress would be nasty for someone with BAD.

And some of these workshops are held several time zones away from where a person lives. Travelling rapidly through time zones can be enough to destablize someone with BAD.

Hornbacher wrote that one of her worst episodes was triggered by taking a plane flight from the US to London for a book tour.

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Re: James Arthur Ray - 2 die at Arizona retreat's sweat lodge
Posted by: Sol Ivictus ()
Date: December 20, 2009 10:02AM

Quote
The Anticult
________QUOTE from article_____________
Another activity at Modern Magick is something called “Dreamers and Dreamed”. Participants were put on silence and not allowed to talk to anyone and then had to wander around to different “stations”. At these “stations” the participants were supposed to hold their arms out in front of their face and look at their palms. They would then flip their hands to look at the back and say something like “Is this real or is this a dream?” after they had done this at the different stations they would go back to the classroom and lay down on their mat. They would rest for a bit and then they were supposed to get up and do the exact same thing, over and over again. This went on for about two hours, maybe longer. It was stressed to participants how important it was to do the exact same routine without variation.
______QUOTE____________

If you look at the paper "Noninformative vision improves the spatial resolution of touch in humans" [eprints.ucl.ac.uk] the important point is that bimodal cells in the brain are forced to increase your sensory abilities when you stare at your hand or arm. That means that these areas of the brain are not available to do other processing - like analytic thought. Similarly speaking activates parts of the brain that are associated with analytic thought. Just looking at your hand, not speaking and repeating a loaded mental chant might put many people right into an altered state of consciousness that is highly suggestible.

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Re: James Arthur Ray - 2 die at Arizona retreat's sweat lodge
Posted by: dsm ()
Date: December 20, 2009 01:46PM

The wake-up in daylight thing is also important for people with tendencies to depression.

My doctor explained that there is actually an enzyme triggered by neurons in the retina when bright sunlight hits it which helps the body move out of the sleep state. He told me to get up and get into bright light within 15 minutes of waking and stay in it for at least 20 minutes, and if I still felt unmotivated, go ahead back to bed, but at least just sit in that light for that bit of time. He said if bright sunlight was not available to have a couple of 100-watt incandescent bulbs on in the room.

Some people are diagnosed with Seasonal Affect Disorder which is really just light-deprived depression.

It is an actual physiological, not psychological, thing that is going on with the body's enzymes. Certainly when we are fully awake our own judgement is much less vulnerable to suggestion than when we are in a half-sleepy state. These gurus can manipulate the depressives as well as the manics by playing with sleep cycles.

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Re: James Arthur Ray - 2 die at Arizona retreat's sweat lodge
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: December 20, 2009 11:38PM

The role of light in mood disorders (tiny excerpt to whet the readers appetite.

WARNING:

Any person who abuses this knowledge for manipulative and nefarious purposes deserves to incur a grade 111 anal fissure, thrombosed hemorrhoids and eruption of a pilonidal cyst.

Quote

How Light Affects the Brain
You know about rods and cones, right? Those are the two kinds of receptors in your eyeball, on your retina, for light. But you didn't know that there is another receptor for light in the eye (I'm guessing you don't know, because until I came across this research, I didn't know either, and no one I've talked to about this has heard about it yet either).

Whereas the rods and cones send information to the visual cortex (the "occipital cortex", at the back of your head), this other light receptor sends its information to your biological clock center. The nerve cables from these receptors don't even go to the vision center at all. They go straight to the middle of your brain, to a region of the hypothalamus called the suprachiasmatic nucleus, which is very well known to be the location of the biological clock for us humans. (That's an oversimplification but the general idea is correct. For the minute details, light researchers would prefer an overview and series of articles in Nature 2005).

You know about this clock, right? Everybody has one: it's the gizmo that is setting your biological rhythms every day -- when you feel like eating, when you feel like sleeping, when you feel like getting up in the morning. It's the gizmo that gets confused by east-west travel, causing "jet lag". It regulates hundreds of chemical reactions all timed to match the natural cycle of days and nights in our environment.

Or what used to be our environment.

Nowadays we've altered that environment in many ways, of course* (Nature is getting ready to get back at us, big time; but hey, that's our kids' worry, not ours, right?). Ahem, back to the main idea here: we've altered our Light Environment more than anything except CO2 (sorry, digressed again, I don't know why I keep doing that). Okay, so we've got electric light now, right? We can have LIGHT when we used to have DARKNESS.

*The author is not even thinking about high pressure workshops and LGATS, either. I must note that an acquaintance married to a fellow with bipolar told me her husband triggered a severe episode by 1) going off his medications and 2) getting his first internet account and then staying up all night, web surfing. Centuries ago, only the very rich could afford candles and oil lamps sufficient for late night marathon events. Everyone else went to beddy bye at sundown.
[www.psycheducation.org]

Here is a bit of education on the biological clock mechanism.

The Biological Clock, Light, and Lithium (Updated and corrected, 8/2008)

[www.psycheducation.org]

An article quoted here notes that much of this research was done by scientists
interested in human metabolism and appetite regulation.

Quote

Clock Molecule's Sensitivity To Lithium Sheds Light On Bipolar Disorder
ScienceDaily (Feb. 21, 2006) — Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine discovered that a key receptor protein is a critical component of the internal molecular clock in mammals. What's more, this molecule -- called Rev-erb -- is sensitive to lithium and may help shed light on circadian rhythm disorders, including bipolar disorder. The findings, which also provide insight into clock-controlled aspects of metabolism, are reported in this week's issue of Science.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"We're interested in the internal control of metabolism because feeding behavior is on a daily cycle, and hormonal activities that regulate this are circadian," says senior author Mitch Lazar, MD, PhD, Director of the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism at Penn. "Many studies, including those here at Penn, suggest a relationship between the human circadian clock and metabolism. Proteins are the gears of the clock, and not much is known about what regulates protein levels within the cell."

Rev-erb was known to be a key component of the clock that exists in most cells of the body. Rev-erb inhibits clock genes called bmal and clock, but within a normal 24-hour circadian cycle the Rev-erb protein is destroyed within the cell, allowing bmal and other clock proteins to increase. Among other actions, these clock genes cause Rev-erb to increase, which again inhibits bmal and clock. "The time it takes for that to happen determines the length of the cycle -- roughly 24 hours -- and keeps the clock going," explains Lazar.

Penn colleague and coauthor Peter Klein, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, discovered a few years ago that the drug lithium, used to treat biopolar illness, inhibits GSK3, an enzyme known to regulate circadian rhythm in several animal species. In the present study, the researchers showed that the destruction of Rev-erb, a receptor shown previously by Lazar and others to play a role in maintaining normal metabolism, is prevented by GSK3 in mouse and human cells. "It's like pulling a pin out of the gears of the clock, to allow them to turn in a synchronized manner," says Lazar.

Lithium blocks this action of GSK3, tagging Rev-erb for destruction, which leads to activation of clock genes such as bmal1. "We suggest that just as our cells in the incubator need to have their internal clocks reset, maybe this is what happens in some people with circadian disorders," says Lazar. "One effect of lithium may be to reset clocks that become stuck when Rev-erb levels build up."

These results point to Rev-erb as a lithium-sensitive component of the human clock and therefore a possible target for developing new circadian-disorder drugs. Some patients taking lithium have developed kidney toxicity and other problems. Lazar surmises that new treatments that lead to the destruction of Rev-erb would have the potential of providing another point of entry into the circadian pathway.

Noting that Rev-erb is present in metabolically active tissues, Lazar and his team at the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism are also interested in the relationship between the control of the circadian clock and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. "There is a dynamic interplay between circadian rhythms and metabolism," Lazar says. "You don't eat while you are sleeping, and the body needs to take this into account."

Study co-authors are Lei Yin and Jing Wang, both from Penn. The research was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Mental Health

[www.sciencedaily.com]

The homepage for the psych education website is here:

[www.psycheducation.org]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/20/2009 11:44PM by corboy.

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Re: James Arthur Ray - 2 die at Arizona retreat's sweat lodge
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: December 20, 2009 11:53PM

Quote

Treatment Implications

There are two aspects of this story with major implications for treatment of bipolar disorder: first, sleep and rhythm; and then, darkness and light (particularly one kind of light).

The author strongly advises, even pleads that sleep hygeine is greatly supported by avoiding light from TV and computer screens 2 hours before your scheduled bed time.

This is in line with advice from other sources on sleep hygiene.

Sleep and Rhythm

This one's pretty simple. Everybody needs sleep. But people with bipolar disorder need to protect it. Sleep deprivation is associated with having manic symptoms. But perhaps even more important than sleep, or at least as important, is rhythm: the sleep needs to happen at the same time every day to keep your clock organized (Corboys italics)). Move it around too much and you may be setting yourself up for cycling, perhaps even the harder to treat version, "rapid cycling".

Thus most people with bipolar disorder will not be able to do "shift work", where the work day is rotating around the clock. That's probably about the worst kind of job schedule you could arrange. A close second worst is might be an international job like pilot or flight attendant, changing time zones over and over again. Third worst would be graveyard shift work, unless you were extremely attentive to keeping your light exposure limited to your "day", and avoiding real daylight during your "night" (heavy blinds and a sleep mask, for example). Even then we might wonder if there's something about "real" daylight that's important to synchronize with your internal clock.

So, the treatment bottom line: have regular sleep hours -- even on weekends. I know, it's going to feel really stupid to be getting up at 6 am on a Saturday. You'll probably have to conduct some personal tests to find out if this is really worth it. I'll admit: even if it's theoretically a good idea for the long run, you'll probably never be able to keep it up unless you discover some shorter-term benefit as well. So keep some mood/energy/sleep records (several charts are linked from my home page; bottom bullet in the Bipolar II section) and see what you think.

[www.psycheducation.org]

DISCLAIMER

Corboy note: following this quoted excerpt,, the author alleges that some persons with bipolar successfully treated themselves using a balance of light and total dark therapy.

The author makes clear this is all non standard. This meant for education only and is NOT an endorsement or an opinion of the Ross Institute or even my own.

I had to attend a funeral for someone who had bipolar and would not take her medication or chart her moods. The room was packed with heart broken friends.

So please, take care of your moods if you have BAD and dont make your pals cry for you.




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/20/2009 11:56PM by corboy.

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Re: James Arthur Ray - 2 die at Arizona retreat's sweat lodge
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: December 21, 2009 12:04AM

Apologies if this has drifted off course from the topic at hand. But sleep deprivation is of the utmost importance in supporting thought and brain function...and is endangered in the typical LGAT setting.

Many persons in this culture are sleep deprived. Imagine their vulnerability if put in a 'workshop' situation, even if they're not genetically loaded for depression or bipolar.

[forum.culteducation.com]

Quote

But...anyone running that short on sleep is according to that young physicians study, impaired, as if DUI.

Its probably unlikely that someone with bipolar would last long term as a LEC volunteer or paid employee, because they'd be so likely to get destabilized by the long hours that they'd go manic and be unable to behave in the controlled precise way required by program protocol.

But any subject paying to do the course who has biochemical predisposition to bipolar...that's someone who might well be at risk.

No, I dont have info on whether insomniacs would be more vulnerable to brainwashing.

Under enough pressure, most of us become vulnerable. But, someone already running low on sleep probably would be at some additional risk.

For this we need imput from a professional--these are my educated guesses.

The problem is, our whole culture devalues sleep.

A real human potential project would ensure that every darned one of us got 8 hours at least of quality snooze each night, every night.

Most of us have little idea how much better we would feel if that were the case.

Sleep as a human right.

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Re: James Arthur Ray - 2 die at Arizona retreat's sweat lodge
Posted by: buffman ()
Date: December 21, 2009 07:11AM

Notably, in his CD program "Get the Edge," Tony Robbins claims that people get "far too much sleep" and says all most people need is 5 or 6 hours a night. He claims that he gets that or less, and that if you exercise more you won't need as much sleep. In other words, he's explicitly encouraging increased sleep deprivation, despite all the evidence that indicates we need more sleep.

Quote
corboy
Apologies if this has drifted off course from the topic at hand. But sleep deprivation is of the utmost importance in supporting thought and brain function...and is endangered in the typical LGAT setting.

Many persons in this culture are sleep deprived. Imagine their vulnerability if put in a 'workshop' situation, even if they're not genetically loaded for depression or bipolar.

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Re: James Arthur Ray - 2 die at Arizona retreat's sweat lodge
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: December 21, 2009 10:06AM

Sleep is a Human Right

Quote

It’s estimated that 60-80 million Americans nearly 40% of women and 30% of men suffer from an inability to fall asleep or stay asleep when they want to. Only 32% of Americans get the recommended eight hours of sleep.

Read more here--website of Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

The need for regular sleep routine for those with bipolar

[www.bipolarblues.com]

[www.dbsalliance.org]

And, Tony Robbins to the contrary, some well respected news magazines have published articles on the problem of widespread sleep deprivation in the United States.

Based on this article alone, one would think that Mr Robbins would WANT his subjects to get lots of high quality sleep, rather than reduce it...

[www.fi.edu]

Additional links to articles that counter Mr Robbins assertion.

"Sleep Deficit: The Performance Killer"

[bx.businessweek.com]

'Its Not Just the Kids Who Need More Sleep"

[bx.businessweek.com]

A Good Nights Sleep-Impossible Dream? Newsweek magazine

[www.newsweek.com]

Sleep Deprivation linked to glucose intolerance and increased risk of Type 2 Diabetes

[www.google.com]

Finally, I once had a curbside chat with a diabetes educator. She was out there, donating a Sunday afternoon, passing out diabetes prevention literature at a street corner.

During our conversation, the educator told me that at her hospital they found that stress management and sleep were so very important in assisting people to stablise and control their blood sugar levels that they spent the first week of their diabetes education program on the topic of stress management and establishment of sleep hygeine. She said that on the whole, most of us are now aware of the importance of diet, exercise and medication in diabetes management, but that getting good quality sleep and stress managment are often forgotten--US culture has the foolish notion that sleep is an indulgence and a luxury.

We need to consider high quality, age appropriate amounts of sleep to be an essential nutrient and...a human right.

In fact, that right there could be an additional tip off to a potentially abusive group or relationship...anyone who contends that it is beneficial to put you under stress and deprive you of sleep, and accuse you of weakness or claim you have 'self limiting beliefs' if you insist on 8 hours of zzzs a night.

Sleep is a human right.

And remember, --sleep deprivation is the classic method to extract information and false confessions under duress.



Edited 4 time(s). Last edit at 12/21/2009 10:17AM by corboy.

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Re: James Arthur Ray - 2 die at Arizona retreat's sweat lodge
Posted by: The Anticult ()
Date: December 21, 2009 10:48AM

Tony Robbins does that as a deliberate tactic. Robbins knows that most people actually need 7-8 hrs a night, and some need less, some more, everyone is unique.
So he sets up another impossible goal, to encourage people to try to sleep deprive themselves in their daily lives, so they can be a bigshot like him. Of course, Robbins knows most people fail, he sets it up as a goal that is meant to fail.

There was some libel trial about Tony Robbins divorce and his new girlfriend/wife a few years back, where a bunch of embarrasing details came out about Robbins personal life. The guy is a mess. Its a big smokescreen of BS stories.

So if Robbins says he sleeps 5 hrs a night, that would have to be proven by an objective source, and monitored. That is never going to happen.
Its just more bullshit Stories from the master.
And James Ray copied Robbins in many ways, only James Ray got even greedier and tried to take the techniques too far too fast, and people got hurt, and killed.

Same techniques though.

Quote
buffman
Notably, in his CD program "Get the Edge," Tony Robbins claims that people get "far too much sleep" and says all most people need is 5 or 6 hours a night. He claims that he gets that or less, and that if you exercise more you won't need as much sleep. In other words, he's explicitly encouraging increased sleep deprivation, despite all the evidence that indicates we need more sleep.

Quote
corboy
Apologies if this has drifted off course from the topic at hand. But sleep deprivation is of the utmost importance in supporting thought and brain function...and is endangered in the typical LGAT setting.

Many persons in this culture are sleep deprived. Imagine their vulnerability if put in a 'workshop' situation, even if they're not genetically loaded for depression or bipolar.

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James Arthur Ray, Tony Robbins, modeling, NLP, hypnosis, firewalking,
Posted by: The Anticult ()
Date: December 23, 2009 08:29AM

For anyone wanting to research Tony Robbins, paste the line below into Google for 22 news stories on Tony Robbins from Stockwatch.


site:www.stockwatch.com "tony robbins"

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