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Sedona Method and Release Technique
Posted by: Lonnie49 ()
Date: August 16, 2004 02:03AM

Does anybody know anything about either The Sedona Method or The Release Technique?
There are both LGAT style groups influenced by Lester Levenson who died in 1994, whom originally presented the material back in the 1950s. This is a technique that has to do with releasing emotions. You can either learn this in a group setting, or listening to a series of tapes in a home study course. The Sedona Method as presented by Hale Dwoskin is the better known of the two, but from what I’ve heard, The Release Technique as presented by Larry Crane is really more closer to what Lester taught. The reason The Sedona Method is better known is because Dwoskin marketed it better. I’ve yet to hear anything really bad about either group. I would like some feedback if possible.

Also, I wonder if there are LGAT groups that are any good at all?


[www.sedona.com]

[www.releasetechnique.com]

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Sedona Method and Release Technique
Posted by: Concerned Oz ()
Date: August 16, 2004 04:41PM

Lonnie49 - I have not seen you on this board before so welcome.

I would like to answer your last question first:
"I wonder if there are LGAT groups that are any good at all?"

To answer this, we must first recognise that Large Group Awareness Training seminars, (LGAT), are a form of psychological process intended to fast-track a participant from a current way of "thinking" and "being" to a desired way of thinking and being. The key question to ask is: Who's way and thinking and being is the desired way - the facilitatior or the participant.

Ethical practice demands that in a psychologically administered therapeutic process, the client/patient or group participant is to be respected and their unique philosophy of life is also to be respected. An ethical therapist works within the client's world view. The therapist must never impose his/her philosophy onto the client. This includes methods of suggestibility.

[b:42053d2263]All LGATs that I know directly and know of, contain two essential elements:[/b:42053d2263]
1. Their own philosophy;
2. Their particular brand of psychological process.

The two elements are interlinked - the psychological process drives the LGATs philosophy.

This process can be powerful and people are known to have their own personal philosophy, (meaning to life) overrun by the LGAT's philosophy. This is unethical.

If an LGAT is reputible, (and I don't know of any), they should disclose their philosophy and the psychological processes used. If they fluff about on these two points, run a mile.

Second point is: Determine what is it that you are looking for.
Chances are you may find it better in a library, or university if you are interested in studying philosophy. If it is personal growth, search for a reputible counsellor or do a counselling course at a reputible College of Education with government approval and licsiencing. If you have a traditional faith or belief, investigate that more throughly before venturing out.

Third point is: If the LGAT says they have the solution of the keys to the mysteries of life, they don't. Wisdom and knowlege is available in mainstream society.

Personally, I would run a mile from any LGAT.

As regards to Sedona, Hale Dwoskin signs his welcome page on the internet with "Love, Hale". I ask, is this professional? My alarm bells are already ringing.

Hope this helps,
Oz

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Sedona Method and Release Technique
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: August 16, 2004 05:04PM

OZ hit the nail on the head.

My idea of a good LGAT would be something where, after just one or two seminars, you dont need the LGAT any more because you've achieved solid benefits and can apply them in any setting, not needing to return to the LGAT to keep the high going.

Another sign of a good LGAT is they are set up to ensure that you have plenty of time to sleep and there is private time structured right in so that you can go off by yourself, or take a cat nap.

You should be able to choose your own seat and keep it, and the chairs should be comfortably spaced apart.

Finally, there should be no sales pressure. Critical thinking would be appreciated and socially rewarded, not discouraged.

The LGAT should encourage participants to make use of continuing education resources in their areas--resources not sponsored or in any way connected with the LGAT (eg 'Dont underestimate your local city college--city colleges often have excellent small business courses!')

Here are concerns about the LGAT models many of our members have been exposed to:

1) These LGATs promise ( or seem to promise ) fast, even miraculous results. Problem is, people who are interested in fast results are often impatient--both the persons who create the programs, and those who are interested. Right away, impatience can set a person up for trouble.

2) I read a history of the 1960s by Gary Lachman, entitled Turn off Your Mind. In the early days of the Human Potential movement, there was an infatuation with methods of 'rapid de-conditioning'-- which were later incorporated into today's LGATs. The thing that jumped out at me was how many of the people who developed these dangerous 'rapid deconditioning' techniques, were impatient, immature, and, above all, power hungry. Even when such persons were altruistic, their impatience, immaturity and lust for power led them to endanger themselves--and others.

3) The more rapid a method is, the greater the risk that it will merely add a layer of confusion or even trauma, to what you already have.

4) The more rapid and dramatic the changes produced by any technique, whether it is an LGAT or something else, the greater the risk that the relief you obtain is by 1) suppressing your troubles, rather than achieving personal insight and integration and 2) the rapid methods tend to put the focus on, and enhance the power of the LGAT leader, making the subjects more childlike.

5) Because the high is based on suppression of your issues, rather than resolution of them, the high is dependant on the unique social setting of the LGAT, making you dependant on the LGAT, instead of enabling you to
'graduate' and not need the LGAT after gaining the benefits.

Methods that are slow, where you know what techniques are used, are less glamorous and feel less magical precisely because you stay conscious, stay adult and the results come 'from your own juices'. You'll feel the benefits when out of the LGAT setting.

You'll come out feeling invigorated, but still yourself. You wont be high, which means you wont be vulnerable to a let down, either.

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Sedona Method and Release Technique
Posted by: elena ()
Date: August 16, 2004 07:06PM

I wonder if anyone has constructed a "family tree" of all the people who have made money using the ideas and techniques formulated by L. Ron Hubbard?

It would be rather extensive. And I guess one would have to start with Mme Blavatsky, Mary Baker Eddy, and Aleister Crowley.



Ellen

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Sedona Method and Release Technique
Posted by: Aurora ()
Date: August 16, 2004 07:51PM

Great posts Oz and corboy re: LGATs

One question that comes to mind is: can an LGAT maintain/support someone's individuality as the nature of the experience has a large group orientation?

Any examples of an ethically sound or "good" LGAT?

I was thinking perhaps a bereavement group but they typically have a much smaller number of participants so that the experience can be more individualized or intimate. Plus they meet weekly or monthly for a limited # of times usually.

Perhaps a corporate or company sponsored group would be a safe and ethically sound LGAT- depending on the agenda/purpose.

Do you have any objective references you can share for defining an LGAT? All I have been able to find on the web are related to cult-like groups and they naturally have a negative spin.

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Sedona Method and Release Technique
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: August 16, 2004 11:06PM

This website has good information on how pick a growth program.

[perso.wanadoo.fr]

I cant recall if it has any recommendations for specific programs.

But if you look at the checklist on how to pick an LGAT, you can make some inferences on what a features a helpful LGAT is likely to have--and which ones it should NOT have.

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Sedona Method and Release Technique
Posted by: Lonnie49 ()
Date: August 17, 2004 05:09AM

Hello everybody. Thanks for your responses. Finding out whether a training group is manipulative or abusive is only half of the story. The other question is--does it work? Will the training accomplish what it promises? I think that my big problem with both these groups are that they promise you that everything in your life will be transformed in such a short time. In other words, if something sounds too good to be true, then it's probably not. Hmmm.... :?

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Sedona Method and Release Technique
Posted by: elena ()
Date: August 17, 2004 08:12AM

Quote
Lonnie49
Hello everybody. Thanks for your responses. Finding out whether a training group is manipulative or abusive is only half of the story. The other question is--does it work? Will the training accomplish what it promises? I think that my big problem with both these groups are that they promise you that everything in your life will be transformed in such a short time. In other words, if something sounds too good to be true, then it's probably not. Hmmm.... :?



The word "transformed" is just a sort of trick word that they use which doesn't mean much but upon which the manipulators know the audience will assign whatever significance they need or want to hear. They play to those escapist fantasies most of us have from time to time, especially if, through conceit, immaturity, or some other personal failing we have managed to make a disaster of our current relationships. Remember, these programs were designed by con artists whose modus operandi is generally to get out of town where things get sticky. They mirror the personal demons of the gurus and also served to justify and salve their own egos. (If you think Werner Erhard, L. Ron Hubbard, or one of their other clones isn't still the main ~source~ of this program, think again.)


Ellen

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Sedona Method and Release Technique
Date: March 02, 2006 01:14AM

I was involved with the Sedona Method for several years and, honestly, it didn't really help me very much.

In reading some materials on Scientology, I was struck by the similarity of Hubbard's tone scale and the scale of emotions used in the Sedona Method. Also the use of repetitive questions in order to "release" problems in the Sedona Method seems to bear some resemblence to auditing. I have been trying to get more background on the Sedona Method to see if Lester Levenson was influenced by EST or Scientology but have not been able to find anything but glowing testimonials on the Internet.

If anyone has more information or can point me to it, it would be appreciated.

Thanks!
QE

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Sedona Method and Release Technique
Posted by: BuddyBear ()
Date: March 02, 2006 10:11AM

The Sedona Method sound like Dahn Yoga's version which is called shim sung. It lasts for a weekend and it sounds exactly like what you described with the Sedona Method. It is very emotionally charged and many people cry and have emotional breakdowns. There is a lot of manipulation going on as well. By the end you are no longer in charge of your thoughts, but have adopted the thoughts and ideas given to you by the masters running the training. In the end they will try to have you sign up for more courses for a far greater expense.

I wrote on another thread on this website about Lester Levinson. He is referred to as Saint Lester Levinson by Ilchi Lee, the founder of Dahn Yoga. Their property in Sedona which is called Mago Garden was once owned by Lester Levinson. Lester Levinson is buried there near the horse stables and is claimed by Lee to be a holy place and an energy vortex.
I have seen members do bow training to Lester Levinsons grave as well as meditation.

Stay away from Dahn Yoga, it is a cult.

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