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Help needed to stop DDoS attack
Posted by: zenon ()
Date: March 19, 2008 03:20AM

Update 2008-03-28: It seems there is no need for any more copies of the article. Big thank you to everyone who helped.

===
This message board is now again the target of a massive DDoS attack. That's why everything is slow and unresponsive right now and that's also the reason why the board was down all of the weekend 7-9 March. The attacker is the same fruit basket that has been attacking www.culteducation.com ever since September last year: Bruce Raisley.

After almost six months of this shit, it really has to stop. And the way to stop it is to make the attacks counterproductive for Raisley himself. That's where you can help.

Please create a page on as many free websites and blogs as you can find and post this article on them. Post it also in newsgroups and message boards. Share it over your e-Mule, Kazaa and whatever bittorrent tracker you happen to like. With your help we can have the article on several hundred distinct URLs within a day or two, so that Raisley finally realizes that attacking this site is not in his best interest.

If you are willing to help, please e-mail me at raisleycampaign@provocation.net the URLs of the websites and blogs that you create. And let's show that bastard the power of a collective response to his aggression and arrogance.

Z



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/29/2008 02:17AM by zenon.

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Re: Help needed to stop DDoS attack
Posted by: John Fox ()
Date: March 21, 2008 02:35PM

Giving an almighty virtual finger to our fiend, the article is now also posted at ...

[www.culthelp.info] (click to go direct to article)

John Fox

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Re: Help needed to stop DDoS attack
Posted by: zenon ()
Date: March 24, 2008 10:21AM

Yeah, they're spreading. Not as fast as I hoped, but yet:

[raisleyddos.rediffblogs.com]
[www.tingleff.org]
[www.blurty.com]
[www.xenu-directory.org]
[raisleyddos.freetzi.com]
[cultxpt.wordpress.com]
[raisleyddos.angelfire.com]
[home.snafu.de]
[raisleyddos.livejournal.com]

Raisley knows this, but he doesn't know when to call it quits. Too bad for him; he'll end up destroying himself.

Z



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/24/2008 01:42PM by zenon.

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Re: Help needed to stop DDoS attack
Posted by: John Fox ()
Date: March 24, 2008 12:11PM

Perhaps we could employ the Slashdot effect ... in terms of propagating the article?

John

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Re: Help needed to stop DDoS attack
Posted by: zenon ()
Date: March 24, 2008 01:35PM

Quote
John Fox
Perhaps we could employ the Slashdot effect ... in terms of propagating the article?

No, not just yet. If you play out good cards too early, you'll have to play too high in the next round. Let's see if Raisley can get back to his senses and only then escalate again. I have a whole stack of cards up my sleeve; /. would be only one of them.

Z

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Re: Help needed to stop DDoS attack
Posted by: John Fox ()
Date: March 24, 2008 02:21PM

We're standing with you anyway, regardless of the consequences. Cowards don't survive long in the anti-cult arena anyway.

John

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Re: Help needed to stop DDoS attack
Posted by: zenon ()
Date: March 26, 2008 12:14PM

Well, Raisley has survived longer than I would ever have expected, much thanks to his brutal stupidity. Like the Neanderthaler, sort of, who also survived way past his prime time while cementing his own destruction. Anyway, I think Raisley took the point this time. The attack on Rick's server stopped on Monday. And an attack on my own server which begun on Friday, stopped today. In the meanwhile people have sent me a bunch of new URLs where Strange Bedfellows has been posted. I'm keeping them to myself for now, so I can have something new to feed Google with in case the attacks begin again.

Bruce, since I know you read this, I'll take the opportunity to give you advance warning again. You are attacking www.tingleff.org and I am right now fiddling with its DNS. Sometime Wednesday afternoon, my time zone, you might again find your bots attacking your own server. Repent and be saved - for now.

Z



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/26/2008 12:16PM by zenon.

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Re: Help needed to stop DDoS attack
Posted by: The Anticult ()
Date: July 04, 2009 05:36AM

It appears that someone named Bruce Raisley mentioned above is in the news.

[www.culteducation.com]
Pennsylvania computer programmer accused of attempting to bring down websites that ridiculed him
New Jersey Star-Ledger/June 30, 2009
By Joe Ryan
Newark - A computer programmer was charged in federal court today with trying to cripple nine websites, including RollingStone.com, that posted articles about him being duped into meeting a fictitious woman he met online.
Bruce Raisley, 47, of Monaca, Pa., surrendered to FBI agents in Newark...[...]

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Re: Help needed to stop DDoS attack
Posted by: John Fox ()
Date: July 04, 2009 06:44PM

All's well that ends well.

John

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Re: Help needed to stop DDoS attack
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: July 10, 2009 03:28AM

An Educational Article on How DDos Attacks are Perpetrated

[tech.yahoo.com]

Quote

Tech 101: How a denial-of-service attack works
By JORDAN ROBERTSON, AP Technology Writer - Wed Jul 8, 2009 3:53PM EDT

How does this type of cyber attack work? And how can people make sure their computers are safe?

Here are some questions and answers about the attack.

Q: What is a "denial-of-service" attack?

A: Think about what would happen if you and all your friends called the same restaurant over and over and ordered things you didn't even really want. You'd jam the phone lines and overwhelm the kitchen to the point that it couldn't take any more new orders.

That's what happens to Web sites when criminals hit them with denial-of-service attacks. They're knocked offline by too many junk requests from computers controlled by the attackers.

The bad guys' main weapons in such an attack are "botnets," or networks of "zombie" personal computers they've infected with a virus.

The virus lets the criminals remotely control innocent people's machines, which are programmed to contact certain Web sites over and over until that overwhelms the servers that host the sites. The servers become too busy to respond to anything, and the Web site slows or stops working altogether.

It's different from what usually happens when you try to access a Web site. Normally, you just make one request to see the site, and unless there's a crush of traffic from something like a big news event, the servers respond well.

Hijacked PCs, on the other hand, are programmed to send way more traffic than a normal user could generate on his or her own.

Q: How often do these attacks happen?

A: People try denial-of-service attacks all the time — many government and private sites report being hit every day.

Often the assaults are unsuccessful, because Web sites have ways of identifying and intercepting malicious traffic. However, sites really want to avoid blocking legitimate Web users, so more often than not, Internet traffic is let through until a problem is spotted.

Denial-of-service attacks are noisy by design, and they intend to make a statement.

They're not subtle attempts to infiltrate a Web site's defenses, which can be much more insidious because that gives hackers access to whatever confidential information is stored there.

Often the attacks take a site out for a few hours, before Web site administrators can respond. What made the most recent attack notable is that it was widespread and went on for a while, beginning over the July Fourth holiday weekend and running into this week. It's not yet clear how the attack was able to last that long.

Q: Some organizations appear to have fended off these recent attacks, while other Web sites went down. How can this be?

A: The sites that went down probably were less prepared, because they are less accustomed to being hit or aren't sensitive enough to warrant extra precautions.

Popular Web sites, like e-commerce and banking sites, have a lot of experience dealing with denial-of-service attacks, and they have sophisticated software designed to identify malicious traffic. Often that's done by flagging suspicious traffic flowing into the site, and if there's enough of it, preventing it from ever reaching the site's servers.

Another approach is to flag suspicious individual machines that seem to be behind an attack, and ban any traffic from them from reaching the site.

That can often be difficult, though, because criminals use "proxy" computers to route their traffic, masking the source of the original requests. Proxy computers are often other infected computers that are part of a botnet.

Q: Is there usually evidence of who the culprits were? Or is the nature of the attack such that it leaves few fingerprints?

A: It's usually easier to stop a denial-of-service attack than it is to figure out who's behind it.

Simply identifying where the malicious traffic is coming from won't get investigators very far, since the infected PCs that get roped into a botnet are owned by innocent people who don't know their computers are being used for nefarious purposes.

Pat Peterson, a security researcher and fellow at Cisco Systems Inc., says sophisticated attackers have also been adding a more subtle approach to evade detection.

Instead of directing huge amounts of traffic at a target site, they'll make more complicated requests one at a time that eat up more of the site's computing power, like trying to log in using bogus usernames and passwords.

If enough of those requests are made, on a site that requires a lot of computing power, the effect can be the same, and the site gets knocked out.

**This type of attack is trickier because it doesn't involve the sort of massive traffic surge that would normally tip off network administrators.

This advanced tactic wasn't necessarily used in the most recent attacks. In fact there are signs the attacks were relatively amateurish. The programming code appears to have been patched together largely from material that has been circulating in the criminal underground for several years, according to Jose Nazario, manager of security research for Arbor Networks.

Q: If these attacks make use of compromised computers corralled into a "botnet," should I be worried about whether my PC is one of them? What could I do to prevent that or fix it?

A: If your computer is being used in a denial-of-service attack, you're likely to see a significant slowdown, because your processing power is being siphoned for the assault. But there aren't always obvious signs that your computer has been infected.

So the best thing is to focus on prevention, namely by having up-to-date antivirus software. In particular, make sure your antivirus software gets updated over the next few days.

If you're concerned your machine might be infected, it's wise to run an antivirus scan. Many antivirus companies offer a free scan from their Web sites.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/10/2009 03:33AM by corboy.

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