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Re: Meditation reduces reactivity to perceived threat
Posted by: facet ()
Date: January 12, 2020 04:16AM

zizlz Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> One more thing I'd like to add: the abuse of
> meditation seems to go hand in hand with
> presenting meditation as some kind of panacea for
> the psyche. Psychoanalysis helped me become aware
> of serious emotional issues I had repressed since
> childhood. Before going into psychoanalysis, I had
> already done years of daily meditation, but none
> of that helped me see my psychological blind
> spots. I think people who are attracted by cults
> often have psychological issues they have to deal
> with, and when the cult tells them they can fix
> themselves by meditating, they are led astray.
> Also: there's many ways to meditate, including
> wrong ways. I know someone who got into some kind
> of trance-like state during meditations, where
> there was little or no thought, but not much
> awareness or clarity either. So on second thought
> I have to agree that in some cases meditation can
> be a bit like a tranquilizer. But generally I
> don't think that's the case.


I didn’t see this before I posted, apologies, yes meditation is presented as a panacea. It isn’t the answer to everything and I think many of us go into it wishing that it was, because we couldn’t get answers at the regular doctors anymore. Definitely there are ways not to meditate, I think there can be some confusion between dissociate and meditate sometimes.

Pscychoanalysis is amazing. I am glad to hear it has helped you, it has helped me too. It is great for blind spots, we cannot see all of our workings alone, and saying that I would say that lethal scrutiny is required when about to work with someone on these brain levels, something that the cults world gets away with.

I think more awareness of our human bodies and how they are working may help people stay out of cults, recently science acknowledged the vagus nerve being a ‘centre of wellbeing’, which I think is a start.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/12/2020 04:34AM by facet.

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Re: Meditation reduces reactivity to perceived threat
Posted by: zizlz ()
Date: January 12, 2020 04:16AM

Quote
facet
When something isn’t working in some way, and there is a stress response that is overridden in order to adapt, is it not that there is a resurgence of the same thing? Causes not dealt with, signals to change something increasing?

When the prefrontal cortex is more involved and the amygdala is less involved in the response to a situation, I think that doesn't mean that you're slower to react or less likely to react when needed, but that you do so with less stress and anxiety. But I'm no expert; I'm not sure. If you feel a more instinctive (amygdala-dominant) way of responding works better for you, I don't know, you may be right about that. Maybe it works differently for different people. I used to have too much anxiety and only a fraction of that has remained now, maybe due to my meditation practice. In my job I often have to respond quickly and accidents could easily happen if I didn't, but if anything, I feel I'm now more capable of quick and appropriate reaction than I was in my more anxious days.

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Re: Meditation reduces reactivity to perceived threat
Posted by: zizlz ()
Date: January 12, 2020 04:24AM

Quote
facet
Definitely there are ways not to meditate, I think there can be some confusion between dissociate and meditate sometimes.

Yes very well said! That's exactly what I meant — improper meditation can quickly become a form of dissociation. The state that person seemed to be in during meditation was a sort of dissociative bliss. Someone else I know who tries to learn meditation has a tendency to repress her thoughts, which is also unhealthy, of course.

Quote
facet
I think more awareness of our human bodies and how they are working may help people stay out of cults, recently science acknowledged the vagus nerve being a ‘centre of wellbeing’, which I think is a start.

I don't even know what the vagus nerve is; I'm going to read up on that, sounds interesting!

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Re: Meditation reduces reactivity to perceived threat
Posted by: facet ()
Date: January 12, 2020 05:05AM

I found the same article, link though enjoy your own researches, you’l find lots!

I am no expert either, so same for me.

With our differing meditation experiences, and we can expand that to others too, maybe this is where neuroplasticity (our wiring) comes into play.

Being unique for each of us, we experience various results with the same interventions.

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