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Re: The downside of yoga
Date: April 07, 2019 03:48AM


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Re: The downside of yoga
Posted by: Paul T Harrison ()
Date: April 07, 2019 06:23PM

Fortunately I learned Yoga with private lessons in a method that was super gentle. After a few poses or at anytime, I would go in to corpse pose in order for the body to allow the effects to take place.

This approach has helped me through my life, and now is a life saver in old age. My teacher changed over the years to accommodate the mpre extreme yoga styles, but I kept going the original way.

When I was about 50 years old, I was still in excellent shape and I decided to push yoga to the next level..... well for the first time, I injured my back. It took a long time to heal, and taught me a good lesson.....

Interestingly I never got into head or shoulder stands, and now the article is pointing out that head stands are dangerous..... Gentle is the way with Yoga and it is nothing to fool around with....

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Alleged Yoga Cult - The Leader Sticks His Finger Up Your Butt
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: June 04, 2019 10:19PM

Quote


How can I tell if my yoga class is a cult?

Do your research! Unlike in the Summer of ’69, we have the Internet that can provide a lot of information. “If you Google an organization and multiple posts come up suggesting it might be a cult — don’t go,” says Lalich. And trust your instincts while they are still in tact. Lalich recently did research on an alleged yoga cult where the leader sticks his finger up your butt: “If you are in an environment like that and everyone is acting like it’s normal — run out the door.”

Why You’re Closer To Joining A Cult Than You Think
COURTNEY SHEA
JUNE 3, 2019, 12:59 P.M.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 06/05/2019 12:08AM by corboy.

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Re: The downside of yoga
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: June 07, 2019 08:10PM

Yoga and Buddhism Reform Movements: 16 Red Flags

[matthewremski.com]

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Yoga, Yogananda, Ananda Yoga - an Academic History
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: June 15, 2019 10:57PM

Quote


[searchworks.stanford.edu]

Biography of a yogi : Paramahansa Yogananda and the origins of modern yoga

Anya P. Foxen.
Publication
New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2017]
Copyright notice
©2017
Physical description
xviii, 238 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm

Foxen, Anya P., 1986- author.

Contents/Summary
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 191-228) and index.
Contents

The turbaned superman
Yogis without borders
Here comes the yogiman
Yogi calisthenics
Hagiography of a yogi.

Summary

With over four million copies in print, Parmahansa Yogananda's autobiography has been translated into thirty-three languages, and it still serves as a gateway into yoga and alternative spirituality for countless North American practitioners.

This book examines Yogananda's life and work to clarify linkages between the seemingly disparate aspects of modern yoga, and illuminates the intimate connections between yoga and metaphysically-leaning American traditions such as Unitarianism, New Thought, and Theosophy.

Instead of treating yoga as a stable practice, Anya P. Foxen proposes that it is the figure of the Yogi that gives the practice of his followers both form and meaning.

Focusing on Yogis rather than yoga during the period of transnational popularization highlights the continuities in the concept of the Yogi as superhuman even as it illuminates the transformation of the practice itself.

Skillfully balancing traditional yogic ritual, metaphysical spirituality, physical culture, and a flair for the stage, Foxen shows, Yogananda taught a proto-modern yoga to his American audiences. His Yogoda program has remained under the radar of yoga scholarship due to its lack of reliance on recognizable postures. However, as a regimen of training for the modern Yogi, Yogananda's method synthesizes the spiritual and superhuman aspirations of Indian traditions with the metaphysical and health-oriented sensibilities of Euro-American progressivism in a way that exactly prefigures present-day transnational yoga culture.

Yet, at the heart of it all, Yogananda retains a sense of what it means to be a Yogi: his message is that the natural destiny of the human is the superhuman.
(source: Nielsen Book Data) 9780190668051 20171121

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Re: The downside of yoga
Posted by: allalong ()
Date: June 17, 2019 12:51AM

Paul T Harrison Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Fortunately I learned Yoga with private lessons in
> a method that was super gentle. After a few poses
> or at anytime, I would go in to corpse pose in
> order for the body to allow the effects to take
> place.
>
> This approach has helped me through my life,
> fe, and now is a life saver in old age. My teacher
> changed over the years to accommodate the mpre
> extreme yoga styles, but I kept going the
> original way.
>
> When I was about 50 years old, I was still in
> l in excellent shape and I decided to push yoga to
> the next level..... well for the first time, I
> injured my back. It took a long time to heal, and
> taught me a good lesson.....
>
> Interestingly I never got into head or
> d or shoulder stands, and now the article is
> pointing out that head stands are dangerous.....
> Gentle is the way with Yoga and it is nothing to
> fool around with....


I greatly appreciate this post. I had recently gotten back into yoga, after not doing it for many years. When I used to do yoga, it was a rather gentle type of Hatha yoga in which you hold poses. The teacher never pushed anyone to do poses they weren't comfortable with. I never got injured, and I always felt relaxed afterward. Yoga philosophy was never pushed onto us, either. My instructor was a lovely woman and didn't seem narcissistic in the least.

When I restarted yoga at a small local studio, I got really into it. I was going as many days a week as my schedule allowed. I felt that "yoga bliss" people describe. But I got injured often and felt pressured to do advanced poses that I was nowhere near ready for. Many poses were uncomfortable to do. With every injury, my doctor kept suggesting to just do gentle yoga. I finally took his advice and now I do gentle yoga once a week. I don't get injured, I no longer attend a cultish studio with an instructor who was all "peace and love" most of the time, but also turned into "witch mode" at the flip of a switch if you don't do what she says to do. I plan on sticking with gentle yoga classes and staying away from the weird stuff.

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Re: The downside of yoga
Posted by: visor56 ()
Date: July 12, 2019 04:35PM

Quote
allalong
With every injury, my doctor kept suggesting to just do gentle yoga.

That’s good advice from your doctor. I like the approach of going to see a certified health practitioner like a physiotherapist and getting their recommendations for exercises, especially if you have specific health issues that might make you “not like everyone else”. If you want to try yoga many of them will be able to recommend specific yoga or yoga-like exercises that will help with getting stronger or with pain reduction for your body type and any health issues you might have. And then they’ll be able to show you how to do them yourself later at home.

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Newly made gemstone malas -- destroyed lungs.
Posted by: corboy ()
Date: July 28, 2019 10:20AM

Before you buy a newly made mala, think twice. About the stone polishers of India.

How the shiny “agate” stones in jewelry and rosary beads are killing workers

GlobalPost

March 21, 2013 · 10:00 AM UTC

By Jason Overdorf

[www.pri.org]

Quote

Diwan's workers “stopped coming” when the deaths of friends of co-workers made it impossible to deny that their jobs were killing them. Some failed to show up because they were dying themselves.

“I was a supervisor for a grinding and polishing unit for 10 years or so,” says Diwan. “But when the workers stopped coming, I did the grinding myself for three or four years.”

Once a proud, muscular man, Diwan is hollow-eyed and emaciated, unable to sleep and hardly able to eat because of a relentless, hacking cough.

Throughout a GlobalPost interview with his family members, he slumps on the stoop of his home and coughs. The sound of it is horrible: a dry, futile rasp that yields no relief. It goes on and on, forcing a listener to imagine the sand that fills his lungs. Finally, he reels forward and spits a long, viscous trail of saliva onto the pavement, making it clear why he has positioned himself on the edge of the stoop.

Then the coughing overcomes him again.

But silicosis is a fate too horrible to wish on anyone, and Diwan only bears a small portion of the blame for the disease that, mercifully, took his life as well, 10 days after he met with GlobalPost.


Quote

Agates vary in color from bright blue to glowing amber and deep black. They yield beautiful striped patterns when cut and polished. In addition to jewelry and rosary beads, they are used for decorative eggs, hearts and spheres and the like. New Age merchants market them as having the power to protect from stress, stomach pain, “energy drains” and even bad dreams. “This is the stone that everyone should have,” asserts one web retailer.

But the stone's silica content means that grinders and polishers are highly susceptible to silicosis, or “grinder's asthma” — an incurable, tuberculosis-like occupational disease. That's especially true in India, where agate workers typically earn less than a dollar a day, and exploitative employment conditions prevent them from adopting even basic safety measures.

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